More Education, Stricter Consequences About Vaping Enforced

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Chris Ybarra

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More Education, Stricter Consequences About Vaping Enforced

The new district policy for having a vape on campus is 6 days of ISS for the first offense, 10 days of ISS for the second offense, and 15 days of DAEP for the third offense.​

The new district policy for having a vape on campus is 6 days of ISS for the first offense, 10 days of ISS for the second offense, and 15 days of DAEP for the third offense.​

Grace Stivers, Photo Editor

The new district policy for having a vape on campus is 6 days of ISS for the first offense, 10 days of ISS for the second offense, and 15 days of DAEP for the third offense.​

Grace Stivers, Photo Editor

Grace Stivers, Photo Editor

The new district policy for having a vape on campus is 6 days of ISS for the first offense, 10 days of ISS for the second offense, and 15 days of DAEP for the third offense.​

As the times change, so do the obstacles that kids face in their school career. A major issue in particular is vaping. An electronic cigarette or an e-cigarette, otherwise known as a vape, works like a regular cigarette, but without the burning of tobacco. The use of vapes has recently spiked both inside and outside of the school, posing a health concern for the nation’s youth. 

In order to deter the dangerous use of vapes, the school has taken on a much stricter policy for vaping. This includes stricter consequences and educational programs such as “CATCH My Breath” during academic period. This policy also covers the usage of cigarettes and chewing tobacco.

​”In Lampasas ISD, we are providing educational videos to show the harm vaping can do.” Principal Joey McQueen said. “LHS has set the consequences to 6 days of ISS for the first offense, 10 days of ISS for the second offense, and 15 days of DAEP for the third offense.We also want to continue with more education, so students understand the ramifications of vaping and students help each other to  refrain from the use of vaping.

The use of vapes has recently spiked both inside and outside of the school, posing a health concern for the nation’s youth. 

Not only in Lampasas, but across America, it has become an epidemic,” Principal Joey McQueen said. “It is evident that it has become an epidemic when large tobacco companies are starting to back off and the age of buying tobacco products is rising from 18 to 21.”

Outside of school, the temptation to vape can be shown in the advertisements, fruity flavors, affordability, easy access and the general ignorance of the effects that vaping can have on the body. 

“Vaping is on the rise among teens and I believe that it has the potential to become a serious problem with our students,” high school nurse Rhonda Hamilton said. “Many e-cigarettes contain nicotine. Nicotine is a harmful, very addictive chemical that can harm the parts of the brain that control attention, learning, mood and impulse control. Nicotine also changes the way connections are built between brain cells when a new memory is created or a new skill is learned.  Nicotine use can increase the risk for future addiction to other drugs. Many people falsely believe that because some e-cigarettes do not contain nicotine, that they are not harmful to the body. Any e-cigarette, whether it contains nicotine or not, contains chemicals and heavy metals that were not meant to be inhaled into the lungs. I have taken care of many adults who were hooked up to oxygen and struggling for every breath that wished they could go back in time and never inhale harmful substances into their lungs.”

E-cigarettes also have the potential to harm students even if they are not using them.

“Defective e-cigarette batteries have caused some fires and explosions, a few of which have resulted in serious injuries,” Hamilton said. “Children and adults have been poisoned by swallowing, breathing, or absorbing e-cigarette liquid through their skin or eyes.”